JL AUDIO 800 Watts |Mono Amplifier


Class D Monoblock Subwoofer Amplifier High-Damping Class D Circuit with discrete control circuitry Pass-through RCA outputs On-board crossover: Variable Low-Pass Filter: 20 -200Hz, Selectable Slope High level inputs CEA-2006 Compliant RMS Power Rating (14.4V): 4 ohms: 640 watts x 1 chan. 2 ohms: 1000 watts x 1 chan. RMS Power Rating (12.5V): 4 ohms: 480 watts x 1 chan. 2 ohms: 800 watts x 1 chan. Frequency Response: 10 - 250Hz Damping Factor: >500 @ 4 Ohms / 50Hz, <250 at 2 Ohms/50Hz Input Range: 200mV - 8V RMS Bass EQ: +6dB Fixed Frequency, Fixed 'Q' with port for optional remote bass control Dimensions: 15.75" L x 9.25" W x 2.36" H


C$190 
  • Brand: JL AUDIO
  • SKU: |e1800D
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Power Specifications - Full Range Channels

RMS Power @ 4 ohms

The RMS power rating is the measure of continuous power that an amplifier can output, or a speaker can handle. It is the most accurate depiction of real, continuous power that the industry has so far.  

If the final impedance of your speakers or subwoofers equals 4 ohms, this is how much power this amplifier will supply at that ohm level. The higher the RMS wattage, the more clean and loud your music will sound. 

                         

640 watts x 1 channels

                 RMS Power @ 2 ohms

The RMS power rating is the measure of continuous power that an amplifier can output, or a speaker can handle. It is the most accurate depiction of real, continuous power that the industry has so far. 

If the final impedance of your speakers or subwoofers equals 2 ohms, this is how much power this amplifier will supply at that ohm level. The higher the RMS wattage, the more clean and loud your music will sound. 

                         

1000 watts x 1 channels

                 RMS Power @ 1 ohm

The RMS power rating is the measure of continuous power that an amplifier can output, or a speaker can handle. It is the most accurate depiction of real, continuous power that the industry has so far.  

If the final impedance of your speakers or subwoofers equals 1 ohm, this is how much power this amplifier will supply at that ohm level. The higher the RMS wattage, the more clean and loud your music will sound. 

                         

Not Stable

                 Bridged RMS Power

Bridging refers to combining two channels on an amplifier to create one channel with double the voltage and an increased power output. A 2-channel amplifier will bridge down to 1-channel and a 4-channel amplifier can bridge to create 2-channels. An amplifier is most commonly bridged to drive a subwoofer. 

Remember, once you bridge two channels down to one its final impedance will be 4 ohms unless otherwise specified. This rating lists the RMS power created once an amplifier is bridged.  

                         

Not Bridgeable

                 

Power Specifications - Subwoofer Channel

RMS Power @ 4 ohmsThe RMS power rating is the measure of continuous power that an amplifier can output, or a speaker can handle. It is the most accurate depiction of real, continuous power that the industry has so far. If the final impedance of your speaker(s) or subwoofer(s) equals 4 ohms, this is how much power this amplifier will supply at that ohm level. The higher the RMS wattage, the more clean and loud your music will sound. The 5th channel on these particular amplifiers are usually dedicated for driving subwoofers.                         


RMS Power @ 2 ohmsThe RMS power rating is the measure of continuous power that an amplifier can output, or a speaker can handle. It is the most accurate depiction of real, continuous power that the industry has so far. If the final impedance of your speaker(s) or subwoofer(s) equals 2 ohms, this is how much power this amplifier will supply at that ohm level. The higher the RMS wattage, the more clean and loud your music will sound. The 5th channel on these particular amplifiers are usually dedicated for driving subwoofers.                         


RMS Power @ 1 ohmThe RMS power rating is the measure of continuous power that an amplifier can output, or a speaker can handle. It is the most accurate depiction of real, continuous power that the industry has so far. If the final impedance of your speaker(s) or subwoofer(s) equals 1 ohms, this is how much power this amplifier will supply at that ohm level. The higher the RMS wattage, the more clean and loud your music will sound. The 5th channel on these particular amplifiers are usually dedicated for driving subwoofers.                         


Power Specifications - Full Range Channels

Peak Power @ 4 ohmsThis form of power rating refers to the maximum amount of power an electronic device can handle or output in an instant without damage occurring. Often times this maximum is achieved during a brief musical burst, such as a drum accent, or low bass hit. 

Some manufacturers display peak power ratings on the face of their products to increase the appeal to consumers. The RMS power rating is more accurate, and we recommend using it for product comparison. However, some manufacture's do not provide an RMS figure and therefore one cannot be advertised.

                         


Peak Power @ 2 ohmsThis form of power rating refers to the maximum amount of power an electronic device can handle or output in an instant without damage occurring. Often times this maximum is achieved during a brief musical burst, such as a drum accent, or low bass hit. 

Some manufacturers display peak power ratings on the face of their products to increase the appeal to consumers. The RMS power rating is more accurate, and we recommend using it for product comparison. However, some manufacture's do not provide an RMS figure and therefore one cannot be advertised.

                         


Peak Power @ 1 ohmThis form of power rating refers to the maximum amount of power an electronic device can handle or output in an instant without damage occurring. Often times this maximum is achieved during a brief musical burst, such as a drum accent, or low bass hit. 

Some manufacturers display peak power ratings on the face of their products to increase the appeal to consumers. The RMS power rating is more accurate, and we recommend using it for product comparison. However, some manufacture's do not provide an RMS figure and therefore one cannot be advertised.

                         


Bridged Peak/Max Power

Bridging refers to combining two channels on an amplifier to create one channel with double the voltage and an increased power output. A 2-channel amplifier will bridge down to 1-channel and a 4-channel amplifier can bridge to create 2-channels. An amplifier is most commonly bridged to drive a subwoofer. 

Remember, once you bridge two channels down to one its final impedance will be 4 ohms unless otherwise specified. This rating lists the Peak/Max power created once an amplifier is bridged.  

                         


Power Specifications - Subwoofer Channel

Peak Power @ 4 ohmThis form of power rating refers to the maximum amount of power an electronic device can handle or output in an instant without damage occurring. Often times this maximum is achieved during a brief musical burst, such as a drum accent, or low bass hit. 

Some manufacturers display peak power ratings on the face of their products to increase the appeal to consumers. The RMS power rating is more accurate, and we recommend using it for product comparison. However, some manufacture's do not provide an RMS figure and therefore one cannot be advertised.

                         


Peak Power @ 2 ohmsThis form of power rating refers to the maximum amount of power an electronic device can handle or output in an instant without damage occurring. Often times this maximum is achieved during a brief musical burst, such as a drum accent, or low bass hit. 

Some manufacturers display peak power ratings on the face of their products to increase the appeal to consumers. The RMS power rating is more accurate, and we recommend using it for product comparison. However, some manufacture's do not provide an RMS figure and therefore one cannot be advertised.

                         


Peak Power @ 1 ohmThis form of power rating refers to the maximum amount of power an electronic device can handle or output in an instant without damage occurring. Often times this maximum is achieved during a brief musical burst, such as a drum accent, or low bass hit. 

Some manufacturers display peak power ratings on the face of their products to increase the appeal to consumers. The RMS power rating is more accurate, and we recommend using it for product comparison. However, some manufacture's do not provide an RMS figure and therefore one cannot be advertised.

                         


Amplifier Specifications

Amplifier SeriesThis designates the series of the amplifier. Many amps are available in a litany of different wattage and channel configurations, but maintain consistent features throughout the product line.                         


Amplifier Class

An amplifier increases the power of the signal being fed to it by taking energy from its power supply and matching the signal but increasing its amplitude. Amplifiers use many different methods for converting these electrical signals and have been categorized into classes. 

Class A/B: Greater than 50% of the input signal is amplified while the other percentage is “off”. These amplifiers have a small amount of current flowing through the output transistors all the time which almost eliminates crossover distortion. Class A/B has great sound quality but is not as efficient as class D. These amps are most commonly used to drive speakers. 

Class D: Also known as switching amplifiers, class D amps have output transistors that are completely turned “on” or “off”. This means that when the transistors are on, there is almost no voltage across them but when they are off there is significant voltage but no current flowing through it which makes these amplifiers very efficient at the cost of sound quality. These amps are most commonly used to drive subwoofers. 

Other Classes: You may see classes such as GH, bD, X, FD, etc. by some manufactures. These amplifiers tend to be either class A/B, D or a hybrid of the two but with improvements to their designs that can make them more efficient or offer better sound quality. 

                 Number of ChannelsEach channel on an amplifier will power one speaker using a positive and negative cable. There are various types of amplifiers, each designed to power a certain number of speakers. Monoblock amplifiers, also known as single channel, are designed to power one or more subwoofers. These amplifiers often have very high power ratings. On the other hand, multi-channel amplifiers power multiple speakers, usually at lower power ratings. 2-Channel and 4-Channel amplifiers can power car speakers or low powered subwoofers. Occasionally you might see a 5 or 6-channel amplifier that can power speakers and subwoofers at the same time. The most common setup is a monoblock amp to run subwoofers and a 4-channel amp to run door speakers. Check out our Knowledge Base for more information.                         

1 - Mono

                 Total Peak Power OutputThe total peak power output is measured as the wattage per channel multiplied by the number of channels, and is calculated at the lowest level of operating impedance. 

It is measured during a brief musical burst, such as a sudden drum accent. Some manufacturers display peak power ratings on the face of their products to increase the appeal. 

The RMS power rating is more accurate, and we recommend using it for product comparison.

                         

Total RMS Power OutputTotal RMS power is measured by multiplying RMS power per channel by the number of channels, and is calculated at the lowest level of operating impedance. 

RMS power is the amount of continuous power, measured in watts, that an amplifier produces is called RMS power. The higher the RMS figure, the louder and cleaner your music sounds. 

The RMS output figure is much more accurate than the peak rating when comparing products.

                         

1000 watts

                 Maximum Input Gauge SizeThis is the largest gauge wire that will fit into the power and ground terminals of this device. The lower the gauge number, the thicker the wire is. For example, a 4 gauge wire is thicker than an 8 gauge wire and thus has higher current carrying capacity. Always do your best to get this size wire to reduce the risk of damage to your components.                         


Minimum Impedance UnbridgedThe lowest impedance the amplifier will handle when it is not bridged.                         

2 ohms

                 Minimum Impedance BridgedThe lowest impedance the amplifier will handle when it is bridged.                         

Not Bridgeable

                 THD at Rated RMS PowerThe amount of change in harmonic content of the signal as it is amplified. A lower figure indicates less change and a more accurate amp. THD below 0.10% is inaudible.                         

1%

                 Speaker Level InputsSpeaker level inputs are commonly referred to as high-level inputs and vice versa. This input type allows you to get your audio signal directly from the speaker wire in your vehicle, instead of using RCA cables. The advantage of this is factory integration, as most stock radios do not have RCA outputs to run amplifiers.                         

Yes

                 Preamp OutputsMany amplifiers are equipped with RCA preamp outputs which pass the original music signal from the source to additional amplifiers. This is known as daisy chaining because the source connects to the first amp, and the first amp connects to the second amp, etc. The advantage to daisy chaining is you only need one 2-channel RCA cable to transfer the signal from the head-unit to the amplifier, and then one additional cable for each amp being daisy chained.                         

1 pair

                 Low-Pass Crossover FrequencyThe low-pass crossover frequency is typically used for subwoofers. It can be a fixed crossover point or a variable crossover range. A variable low-pass crossover allows you to select a specific crossover point which allows frequencies below the set crossover point to pass, while making frequencies above the set point gently or harshly roll-off, depending on the steepness of the slope.

The steepness of the roll-off slope is measured in dB/octave and refers to the rate of attenuation (lowering of volume) outside their pass bands.

                         

20 - 400 Hz

                 Signal-to-Noise RatioThis spec compares the strength of the signal to the level of background noise. A higher value indicates less background noise.                         

95 dB

                 Bass BoostThe objective of the bass boost  is to get more kick out of your subwoofer. It is a circuit that emphasizes the lower frequencies at a given point. The bass boost should always be set first before setting the gain. This feature is known for destroying subwoofers and is commonly used incorrectly, so be cautious.                         

0 - 6 dB

                 Fan CooledA great feature to have if an amp generates a large amount of heat.  Cooling fans can help regulate the temperature to prevent the amp from overheating (burning).                         

No

                 Fuse RatingThe amperage and the number of fuse(s) an amp requires.                         

80A

Condition
Refurbished
Warranty
90 Days Parts and Labor